Child Passenger Safety

Child Passenger Safety Week

Every 33 seconds, a child in the United States is involved in a car crash. That’s a scary statistic. Worse yet, more than a third of kids who died in crashes were completely unrestrained: no car seat, no seat belt, nothing or car seats are not being misused.

Car crashes are a leading cause of death for children age 1 to 13.  Many times deaths and injuries can be prevented by proper use of car seats, boosters and seat belts.

September 23 -29, 2018 is Child Passenger Safety Week to remind parents and caregivers to make sure that they are properly using and installing their child safety seats. The AAP recommends infant and toddlers should ride in a rear-facing car safety seat as long as possible, until they reach the highest weight or height allowed by their seat.

In the District of Columbia DDOT, MPD, DMV, Safe Kids DC, EMSC and DC FEMS will be hosting Car Seat Inspection/Installations Events around the city.

Monday
September 24, 2018

Children’s Hospital (garage)

111 Michigan Avenue NW

Car Seat Inspections

10:00am – 3:30pm

Tuesday
September 25, 2018

DMV Inspection Station

Car Seat Inspections

6:00am – 2:00pm

 

Traffic Division

501 New York Avenue NW

Booster Seat Tuesday

8:00am – 8:00pm

Wednesday

September 26, 2018

DMV Inspection Station

Car Seat Inspections

6:00am – 2:00pm

Thursday

September 27, 2018

Trusted Health

3732 Minnesota Avenue NE

CPS Education Session

1:00pm – 3:00pm

DMV Inspection Station

Car Seat Inspections

6:00am – 2:00pm

Friday

September 28, 2018

DMV Inspection Station

Car Seat Inspections

6:00am – 2:00pm

DC FEMS-Engine 26

340 Rhode Island Ave NE

Car Seat Inspections

3:00pm – 7:00pm

Saturday

September 29, 2018

JPMA

US Capitol Senate Parking Log

National Seat Check Day

10:00am -1:00pm

DMV Inspection Station

National Seat Check Day

2:00pm – 7:00pm

Rear-facing car seat

Your child under age 1 should always ride in a rear-facing car seat in the back seat. There are different types of rear-facing car seats: Infant-only seats can only be used rear-facing. Convertible and 3-in-1 car seats typically have higher height and weight limits for the rear-facing position, allowing you to keep your child rear-facing for a longer period of time.

A rear-facing car seat is the best seat for your young child to use. It has a harness and in a crash, cradles and moves with your child to reduce the stress to the child’s fragile neck and spinal cord.

Forward-facing car seat

Keep your child rear-facing as long as possible. It’s the best way to keep him or her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the rear- facing car seat, your child is ready to travel in a forward- facing car seat with a harness in the back seat.

A forward-facing car seat has a harness and tether that limits your child’s forward movement during a crash.

Booster seat

Keep your child in a forward-facing
car seat with a harness until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the forward- facing car seat with a harness, it’s time to travel in a booster seat, but still in the back seat.

A booster seat positions the seat belt so that it fits properly over the stronger parts of your child’s body.

Seat belt

Keep your child in a booster seat until he or she is big enough to fit in a seat belt properly. For a seat belt to fit properly the lap belt must lie snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach. The shoulder belt should

lie snug across the shoulder and chest and not cross the neck or face. Remember: your child should still ride in the back seat because it’s safer there.

A seat belt should lie across the
upper thighs and be snug across the shoulder and chest to restrain the child safely in a crash. It should not rest on the stomach area or across the neck.

The District is committed to protecting the lives of those traveling on city roads.

VisionZero represents the city's goal of reducing traffic fatalities to zero. Traffic deaths are preventable.

District Department of Transportation

55 M Street, SE • Washington, DC 20003

© DC Road Rules 2017. All rights reserved.